Stylistry

YSL said, "Fashions Fade, Style is Eternal"

This is a blog with an eye for men's style.

Ask me a question? Would be happy to discuss.

If you would like me to work with you to put together a wardrobe, contact me.

Senior Charm #2

beyondfabric:

Ovadia & Sons AW13

What’s not to like about O&S? Season after season brothers Ariel and Shimon keep on delivering tailored twists on classics, making the most of luxurious fabrics, texture combinations and color palette. 

(Source: ovadiaandsons.com, via tetinotete)

Comments

This is really all about marketing.

Curated OEM. 

Love it.

Comments
Put a Belt on it.
Its summer, people. Put a belt on if you have the waist for it. Dont waste it.
:-P

Put a Belt on it.

Its summer, people. Put a belt on if you have the waist for it. Dont waste it.

:-P

(via imansucks)

Comments

AMI Ready-to-Wear SS 2014

I’ve been keeping my eye on Alexandre Mattiussi’s label, AMI for almost 2 years already. Every time I am in Paris, I will be at Le Bon Marche / Printemps Homme to take a look at what he comes up with.

I like alot of things about his work.

First, I like the label name ( French for “friend” and also the beginning and end of his name ).

Second, he wanted to design for a guy who is casual and formal at the same time, having that friend next door look with that French flair.

Third, his pieces are a perfect mix of men’s standards and statement pieces. I got a olive-camel wool coat from AMI last winter and absolutely love the fit. Just a classic overcoat but designed with a fitter silhouette.

 

Now, let’s talk about his new 2014 collection. Love it even more.

Checks off so many of my boxes:

Presentation was done in Palais de Tokyo in Paris. Check.

Stage concept was a airport lounge with baggage claim and trolleys. Check. Check. Check. ( always love the transit/airline/airport theme. because in such themes, you are always travelling Business class and not cattle. Access to lounges is a definite not a perhaps ) 

"Collection was built on separates. More tailored than usual" (WWD). Check.

His tropical prints are done in a controlled manner. Not fancy dandy. Check.

Colors are meant to accent and not take over. Check.

Most importantly.I could see myself wearing alot of the pieces he showed. Yes, even the mustard yellow chinos. Check.

 

AMI is a full on department store French label ( read: prices are not cheap ). I will try to control myself the next time I see this collection in store. Not sure if I can do that. Box unchecked. ;-)

Comments
love everything about this picture.
love the location. love the outfits.
love the bags.
favourite? the red trench coat.
:-)
mrporter:

Hardy Amies ss14 presentation at the Gherkin

love everything about this picture.

love the location. love the outfits.

love the bags.

favourite? the red trench coat.

:-)

mrporter:

Hardy Amies ss14 presentation at the Gherkin

Comments

LIVING FOR BEAUTY

“I live for beauty. For me, just making things that are beautiful makes me happy and makes me want to live each day doing what makes me happy,” 

Patricia Field

 

ME TOO. To me, Beauty is more than just creams and sprays. It. Is. More.

Comments
Winter’s over but I always lust after wool/tweed coats which i can never pull off…

Winter’s over but I always lust after wool/tweed coats which i can never pull off…

(Source: maninpink, via imansucks)

Comments

http://www.tudou.com/v/b6TNJkia9lk/&resourceId=0_04_05_99/v.swf

I mentioned earlier about the GTJ - Go To Jacket. Here you go with the label that landed me my first GTJ.

I chanced upon this label when I was strolling along the beautiful streets of Amsterdam. Stepped into the boutique and started uncovering more and more.

Tried on a black wool jacket. Fits perfectly. Kept me warm ( it was in winter! ). Made me look good. Check.Check.Check.

GTJ bought. 

Thank you Francisco.

Comments

Chanel Resort 2014

Im sure Singapore fashion media must be abuzz with the Chanel Resort 2014 being held in Singapore this week. I can only imagine how some journalists and fashionistas will be scrolling through their entire contact list to find that one connection to snag a ticket.

I like the idea that the tropical island part of Singapore was one again picked up and I’ve always liked the colonial times. Not politically but the style and lifestyles of the people then. Way back when my mum was still learning dressmaking and my grandmother was apparently an expert at washing clothes.

That said, out of the 7 male looks that Karl Lagerfeld showed, i only like 2. In fact, they are probably derivatives of each other. The Nehru collars with contrast piping hints of Military, Manchu and Moscow all at the same time.

I only liked the black jackets and that one long shirt in that first pic. Feels like it has potential to be a go-to jacket. Not too wild about the tiny panel of double-breast buttons on the second pic though.

But seriously, how many real men wear white pants? No matter how runways show men in white pants, i have not seen throngs of men trotting the street in them. Come on, mine wlll get coffee splatters before noon time. This Chanel version looks comfortable, nonetheless. LOL

Comments
putthison:


Proper Garment Care
Buying high quality garments, with the assumption that they’re built to last, only means something if you know how to take proper care of your clothes. Stuffing them into overcrowded closets or sending them off to bad dry cleaners will shorten their life considerably. Fortunately, taking care of your clothes doesn’t require much work. You can accomplish it with just a few minutes a day.
For suits and sport coats, dry cleaning twice a year should be sufficient for anything that’s only worn once or twice a week. Sending it in more often than that will shorten the life and ruin the look of a jacket. That’s because most dry cleaners use harsh chemicals and give hard pressings. You can, of course, use a high-quality cleaner that doesn’t employ such methods, but those will cost you more money.
For every day care, brush the dirt out with a soft bristled garment brush. This will prevent them from getting deep into the fabric, where friction can damage the fibers. It’ll also knock out any food bits that may attract moths. You can buy garment brushes from Kent, though sometimes slightly imperfect ones can be had for a bit cheaper on eBay. For something truly nice, Linkson Jack has some brushes backed with oxhorn.
To begin brushing, wipe down any large, unfinished wooden table, and lay your garment down on the surface. A polished table may be too slippery, so if you only have one of those, put your garment on a blanket or strip of felt so it won’t slide about. If this doesn’t work, you can also brush your garment while it’s on a hanger (though I find it’s harder to really bring some pressure to bear on the brush this way). While brushing, use short flicks of the wrist and always brush in the same direction. Never, ever scrub. You can first brush against the nap to remove any dirt, and then down the nap for a smooth finish. Some people even recommend dampening the brush with some water first for a bit of a freshening up, though I’ve never found the need to do this.
For wrinkles, you can let your jackets hang for a day or two. Heavy wools and linens should naturally relax over time. If you still need to sharpen them up, try using a garment steamer, but be careful to stay away from the seams and don’t go too wild with the device. Otherwise, you can ruin the stitching and take out the shape. Afterwards, hang your jacket on a hanger with flared shoulders. The Hanger Project makes the nicest ones I know of. The width and curvature of their shoulders most closely imitate a man’s natural shoulders, which is what you want. If you can’t afford them, however, Wooden Hanger USA sells some very nice options starting at $7.
If your jackets are finely constructed, you may also want to send them in for a hand press once a year or so. This will help restore their shape, which is often what gives a suit its flattering silhouette. Note, a hand press is different from a machine press. Most places will offer the second, even if they advertise it as the first. Machine presses take shape out; hand presses put shape in. If you can’t find someone in your area who can definitely give your garments a hand press, you can send them to Rave Fabricare.
For sweaters, some cotton ones can be machined wash, but most that say they need to be dry-cleaned will be better served by an at-home hand wash. This is a rather simple process, and Jesse covered the how-to two years ago in this post.
For shirts, pre-treat any stained collars and cuffs with Octagon Bar Soap. Soak your shirt in some water, rub the soap in, and scrub with a fingernail brush. Repeat until you see the dirt rings start fading. Then roll up your wet, soapy shirt and leave it overnight in a plastic bag so that it remains moist. The next day, just launder as usual. Alex Kabbaz, one of America’s best custom shirt tailors, recommends Tide’s Unscented Original. I use Ecover, and mix in some Oxiclean if my shirts are still dirty (as per Jesse’s recommendation). To protect the mother of pearl buttons, I sometimes button my shirts and turn them inside out.
For machine washes, you should always try to use the cold water, gentle cycle, but if you really need to treat stains, hot water for whites and warm water for light colors are often acceptable. Dark colors, however, should always be washed with cold water. After the wash, I strongly recommend hang drying. Machine dryers can take the humidity out of your fabrics, leaving them dull and brittle, which will eventually give them a premature worn-out appearance.
As always, make sure you always consult your garment’s care label for more instructions. They’ll usually at least tell you the bare minimum you have to adhere to.
(Photo from The Trad) 

putthison:

Proper Garment Care

Buying high quality garments, with the assumption that they’re built to last, only means something if you know how to take proper care of your clothes. Stuffing them into overcrowded closets or sending them off to bad dry cleaners will shorten their life considerably. Fortunately, taking care of your clothes doesn’t require much work. You can accomplish it with just a few minutes a day.

For suits and sport coats, dry cleaning twice a year should be sufficient for anything that’s only worn once or twice a week. Sending it in more often than that will shorten the life and ruin the look of a jacket. That’s because most dry cleaners use harsh chemicals and give hard pressings. You can, of course, use a high-quality cleaner that doesn’t employ such methods, but those will cost you more money.

For every day care, brush the dirt out with a soft bristled garment brush. This will prevent them from getting deep into the fabric, where friction can damage the fibers. It’ll also knock out any food bits that may attract moths. You can buy garment brushes from Kent, though sometimes slightly imperfect ones can be had for a bit cheaper on eBay. For something truly nice, Linkson Jack has some brushes backed with oxhorn.

To begin brushing, wipe down any large, unfinished wooden table, and lay your garment down on the surface. A polished table may be too slippery, so if you only have one of those, put your garment on a blanket or strip of felt so it won’t slide about. If this doesn’t work, you can also brush your garment while it’s on a hanger (though I find it’s harder to really bring some pressure to bear on the brush this way). While brushing, use short flicks of the wrist and always brush in the same direction. Never, ever scrub. You can first brush against the nap to remove any dirt, and then down the nap for a smooth finish. Some people even recommend dampening the brush with some water first for a bit of a freshening up, though I’ve never found the need to do this.

For wrinkles, you can let your jackets hang for a day or two. Heavy wools and linens should naturally relax over time. If you still need to sharpen them up, try using a garment steamer, but be careful to stay away from the seams and don’t go too wild with the device. Otherwise, you can ruin the stitching and take out the shape. Afterwards, hang your jacket on a hanger with flared shoulders. The Hanger Project makes the nicest ones I know of. The width and curvature of their shoulders most closely imitate a man’s natural shoulders, which is what you want. If you can’t afford them, however, Wooden Hanger USA sells some very nice options starting at $7.

If your jackets are finely constructed, you may also want to send them in for a hand press once a year or so. This will help restore their shape, which is often what gives a suit its flattering silhouette. Note, a hand press is different from a machine press. Most places will offer the second, even if they advertise it as the first. Machine presses take shape out; hand presses put shape in. If you can’t find someone in your area who can definitely give your garments a hand press, you can send them to Rave Fabricare.

For sweaters, some cotton ones can be machined wash, but most that say they need to be dry-cleaned will be better served by an at-home hand wash. This is a rather simple process, and Jesse covered the how-to two years ago in this post.

For shirts, pre-treat any stained collars and cuffs with Octagon Bar Soap. Soak your shirt in some water, rub the soap in, and scrub with a fingernail brush. Repeat until you see the dirt rings start fading. Then roll up your wet, soapy shirt and leave it overnight in a plastic bag so that it remains moist. The next day, just launder as usual. Alex Kabbaz, one of America’s best custom shirt tailors, recommends Tide’s Unscented Original. I use Ecover, and mix in some Oxiclean if my shirts are still dirty (as per Jesse’s recommendation). To protect the mother of pearl buttons, I sometimes button my shirts and turn them inside out.

For machine washes, you should always try to use the cold water, gentle cycle, but if you really need to treat stains, hot water for whites and warm water for light colors are often acceptable. Dark colors, however, should always be washed with cold water. After the wash, I strongly recommend hang drying. Machine dryers can take the humidity out of your fabrics, leaving them dull and brittle, which will eventually give them a premature worn-out appearance.

As always, make sure you always consult your garment’s care label for more instructions. They’ll usually at least tell you the bare minimum you have to adhere to.

(Photo from The Trad

Comments

Brunello Cucinelli S/S ´13
Somehow, I feel that this presentation of SS2013 looks is better, than with models.

Keeps the focus on the clothes thant the models’ face.

Love the reversible down vest.

(Source: dresslikea)

Comments

Do the right green

Im still not sure if I’m with designer’s Alexandre Mattiussi’s silhouette for his latest RTW Fall 2013 but I’m definitely on board with the rich, deep, velvety, Emerald Green he is showing in a few looks.

Anyway, loving the Emerald Green color trend that Pantone is screaming about for its Color of the Year 2013.

Just, please guys, not pastel emerald for you. Do this version that AMI’s designer is showing. More mature, more grounded.

Im seriously starting to see green in a new light…

P.S. Im not too sure, also, about the green trucker cap that he’s showing with the lumberjack look but it does look non-Christmasy, which I think it’s not easy to do. LOL

Comments
Is it the hair or the face which lets him pull off that scarf and sweater together? #baffledhowstyloandyetimpossibletpachieve

Is it the hair or the face which lets him pull off that scarf and sweater together? #baffledhowstyloandyetimpossibletpachieve

(Source: high-toned.fr, via lum1ey)

Comments

This is not to say that those who want to look good and have quality clothing must pay a lot of money. Rather, I think you can look good on almost any budget provided you have an eye for what works for you, a great alterations tailor, a great cobbler and a great dry cleaner. And time, time to search for the best quality you can find at the price you can afford, time to gain experience with what makes for a good and reliable tailor or maker and what makes for bad, time for quality to reveal itself and in so doing make its price justifiable, if not forgotten.

Réginald-Jérôme de Mans on quality and prices (via putthison)

(via iqfashion)

Comments